Corrado Giaquinto Mid 18th.Century Neapolitan School Red Chalk Study
Corrado Giaquinto Mid 18th.Century Neapolitan School Red Chalk Study
Corrado Giaquinto Mid 18th.Century Neapolitan School Red Chalk Study
Corrado Giaquinto Mid 18th.Century Neapolitan School Red Chalk Study
Corrado Giaquinto Mid 18th.Century Neapolitan School Red Chalk Study
Corrado Giaquinto Mid 18th.Century Neapolitan School Red Chalk Study
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Corrado Giaquinto Mid 18th.Century Neapolitan School Red Chalk Study
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Corrado Giaquinto Mid 18th.Century Neapolitan School Red Chalk Study
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Corrado Giaquinto Mid 18th.Century Neapolitan School Red Chalk Study
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Corrado Giaquinto Mid 18th.Century Neapolitan School Red Chalk Study
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Corrado Giaquinto Mid 18th.Century Neapolitan School Red Chalk Study
  • Load image into Gallery viewer, Corrado Giaquinto Mid 18th.Century Neapolitan School Red Chalk Study

Corrado Giaquinto Mid 18th.Century Neapolitan School Red Chalk Study

Regular price
£1,200.00
Sale price
£1,200.00
Regular price
Unit price
per 
Sold out

Corrado Giaquinto 1703-1766 Neapolitan School Mid 18th.Century Red chalk drawing on blue grey laid paper. Study of a figure with an outstretched arm. Faint pencil inscription lower left "di corrado," further drawing to reverse, a study of a sleeping figure touched by an Angel. Slight waterstain to right hand side, light foxing and creasing to sheet to no real detriment. 26.5 by 19.8 cms.

Born in Molfetta, near Bari, Giaquinto trained in Naples and was influenced by the work of Neapolitan painters Luca Giordano and Francesco Solimena. In 1727 he left Naples for Rome, where his style became increasingly Rococo. Once his reputation was established, Giaquinto was invited twice to the Savoy court in Turin (in 1733 and 1735–9). In 1740 he became a member of the Academy of Saint Luke in Rome and, having set up a studio, he undertook a number of large decorative schemes. In 1753 Giaquinto was summoned by the king of Spain, Ferdinand VI, to Madrid where he succeeded Jacopo Amigoni (1680/2–1752) as court painter. Giaquinto’s most significant commission in Madrid was the fresco decoration of the recently-built Royal Palace. In 1762, after nine years at the Spanish court, Giaquinto moved back to Naples where he continued working for the Spanish monarchy until his death.